UTSA ring tradition sheds light on meaning of graduation

student and family
students and rings

Top photo: Student Megan Lovelady (making Roadrunner hand sign) and her family at the UTSA Ring Ceremony
Bottom photo: Students admire their new rings at the ceremony in the Convocation Center.
(Photos by Mark McClendon)

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(May 7, 2010)--As another semester wraps up, many students are preparing for the final leg in their road to graduation. One tradition that helps shine light on graduation more than any other is the UTSA ring and the ring presentation ceremony. Alumni, juniors and seniors who have completed 60 credit hours are eligible to participate in the ring ceremony. On May 3, nearly 200 UTSA students and former students received their rings at the Convocation Center on the UTSA Main Campus.

Megan Lovelady, a junior communications major, was one of the students receiving a class ring at the ceremony. For her, the ring offers a glimpse at her end goal -- her college degree.

"I can definitely see the light at the end of the tunnel," said Lovelady. "When you get your ring, you know you're getting closer to finishing."

Lovelady had the full support of her mother and father, Steven Lovelady '89 and Deborah Lovelady; grandmother and grandfather, Jean Fetterman and George Fetterman, and sister Kayla Lovelady, who is a Alumni Association Scholarship recipient. For the Loveladys, the ceremony is a fun reminder that UTSA is becoming a family tradition.

"My husband graduated from UTSA in 1989 and Megan was one week old when she came to his graduation," said Deborah. "And now we also have Kayla who is a freshman this year."

Kayla Lovelady, a UTSA mechanical engineering major, understands the benefits of having an older sister at the same school.

"Since she is older, I always get to see the path that she takes and see the end result," said Kayla. "It's a great insider's point of view." Grandma and Grandpa also got involved by purchasing Megan's ring as an early graduation present. The ring can have many meanings to different people. For the Loveladys, the evening was all about family.

"I think the ring really does represent so much more than just a piece of jewelry," said Deborah "They chose UTSA, and we are really proud of them."

The UTSA Office of Alumni Programs administers the ring program. For more information, call 210-458-4133 or visit the UTSA Alumni Programs website and select "Official UTSA Ring."