UTSA hosts anthropology conference on Mexico and Central America Nov. 6-7

jaimeawe

Archaeologist Jaime Awe

Share this Story

(Nov. 1, 2010)--The UTSA Department of Anthropology will host the first South-Central Conference on Mesoamerica Nov. 6-7 in the Buena Vista Street Building Aula Canaria (1.328) at the UTSA Downtown Campus.

Mesoamerica is a region and culture area extending from central Mexico to Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua within which a number of pre-Columbian societies flourished before the Spanish colonization of the Americas in the 15th and 16th centuries.

Free and open to the public, the conference will bring together scholars from various academic fields including anthropology, archaeology, art history and history to present their latest research on the indigenous cultures of Mexico and Central America. With presenters representing more than 20 U.S. universities, the conference will provide a venue for scholars, students and the general public to share ideas, information and interpretations.

At 8:30 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 6, Jaime Awe, director of the Belize Institute of Archaeology, will provide the keynote lecture, "The Bright Side of My Time in the Underworld: 15 Years of Maya Cave Archaeology in Belize."

With 22 years of experience in Maya archaeology, Awe has served as Belize commissioner of archaeology and chief archeologist. He also led the Western Belize Regional Cave Project and the Belize Valley Archaeological Reconnaissance Project. Additionally, Awe taught at universities in Canada, England and the United States.

Other noted scholars will discuss a variety of topics including temples in Guatemala, tomb art in Western Mexico and Aztec female maize deities. For the schedule of speakers, visit the South-Central Conference on Mesoamerica website.

The UTSA Department of Anthropology is dedicated to the exploration of human diversity and provides students with a well-rounded understanding of the fields of anthropology. As a social and biological science, the discipline embraces a broad view of humanity in cultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, biological anthropology and archaeology.