UTSA TRIO program $4 million grant supports transition to college

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(Aug. 22, 2011)--TRIO Programs, a division of the UTSA Office of P-20 Initiatives, has been awarded a Talent Search Grant of more than $4 million from the U.S. Department of Education. The grant will support TRIO's mission to create smooth transitions between secondary and postsecondary education.

"The Talent Search program identifies and assists first-generation and economically-disadvantaged students in middle school and high school who have the potential to succeed in higher education," said Rhonda Moses, executive director of TRIO. "This mission is accomplished by providing direct program services such as academic, career and financial counseling, and assistance with higher education admission applications, in addition to exposing students to various types of postsecondary institutions."

TRIO will receive $230,000 each year for five years to serve San Antonio -- a total of $1,150,000. Another $1,150,000 will be allocated for programs in the Uvalde and Crystal City areas, also at $230,000 a year for five years. An additional $1,906,305 will be given to serve the Brackettville and Eagle Pass areas at $381,261 each year for five years.

"TRIO Programs are a vital component of our educational outreach programs at UTSA," said Jude Valdez, UTSA vice president for community services. "Through these programs, we provide a bridge to college for many of the areas high school students."

TRIO was the name used in the late 1960s for three federally funded educational outreach programs -- Upward Bound, Educational Talent Search and Student Support Services. Later program additions were Educational Opportunity Centers, Training Program for Special Programs Staff and Leadership Personnel and the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement program.

Currently, TRIO Programs at UTSA include Educational Talent Search (San Antonio and surrounding areas), Upward Bound (North Side and South Side), Upward Bound Math and Science (San Antonio and Medina Valley) and the Ronald E. McNair program.