UTSA Retired Faculty Association includes founders who taught at Koger Center

Retired Faculty Association members

UTSA Retired Faculty Association members

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(Sept. 26, 2011) -- The University of Texas at San Antonio will celebrate the launch of the UTSA Retired Faculty Association with a reception from 4 to 5:30 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 28 in the Business Building University Room (2.06.04) on the Main Campus. Current and retired UTSA faculty members are invited to attend.

The association was officially established this month through a memorandum of understanding with the university. Planned RFA projects include documenting the history of UTSA and recognizing faculty-sponsored student awards and scholarships, among others. In recent months, RFA members participated in campus events including the Faculty Honors Convocation and New Faculty Orientation.

Marian Martinello, professor emerita in the Department of Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching, is president of the RFA. Martinello, who joined UTSA in 1975 and was the university's first Piper Professor, retired in 2000.

"UTSA has been a very important part of my life," Martinello said, "and I think it's important for faculty to continue to relate to an institution that has contributed so much to our individual and collective development.

"I see the Retired Faculty Association as having unlimited capabilities. It's only limited by our imagination, and collectively we have a phenomenal imagination."

RFA board members also include Judith Walmsley, chemistry (secretary); Jim Broderick, art and art history (treasurer); Gillian Cook, education, (board member); and Derral Cheatwood, sociology (board member).

Other founding members include Dewey Davis (education), who was the first professor hired by the university in 1973, as well at Charles Field (art and art history), Raymond Padilla (educational leadership), Jacinto Quirarte (art and art history) and Berry Sutherland (education).

"Each of the founding members of the RFA has been quite active in retirement; many of them continue to research, publish and exhibit," said John H. Frederick, provost and vice president for academic affairs. "Frankly, they are a great resource for UTSA, and creating a retired faculty association is a way for us to help preserve the university's intellectual capital."

For more information, visit the UTSA Retired Faculty Association website.