UTSA supporter and Health Science Center radiologist Stewart Reuter dies

UTSA Economic Development

Stewart Reuter

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(July 25, 2012) -- UTSA supporter Stewart R. Reuter, M.D., J.D. and professor emeritus in the Department of Radiology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, died peacefully at his home in Santa Fe, N.M. on July 8, 2012, surrounded by family.

Reuter had a distinguished career as a radiologist, legal scholar and educator.As the author of more than 100 peer-reviewed articles, his research was recognized by national and international scientific organizations around the world.

For more than 25 years, Stewart and Marianne Reuter have supported the UTSA College of Liberal and Fine Arts across a variety of disciplines. Their involvement and support has included English, Modern Languages and Literatures, and most recently the Department of Art and Art History and the Department of Music, where they have established endowed scholarships. The Stewart R. and Marianne C. Reuter Endowed Scholarship in Vocal Performance provides support for undergraduate music majors with a concentration in vocal performance that is a direct reflection of Reuter's great love for opera.

"Stewart was a person of enormous scope, deeply versed in medicine, law and the humanities," said Daniel Gelo, dean of the UTSA College of Liberal and Fine Arts. "Marianne and Stewart's bountiful support of literature, art and music at UTSA is an apt extension of their shared enthusiasm and mastery of these subjects."

Reuter was a pioneer in the field of cardiovascular radiology and was the first to describe the angiographic abnormalities in several disease processes in the abdomen. He was a founding member and fellow of the Society of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, a fellow of the American College of Legal Medicine and the American Heart Association, and an emeritus fellow of the American College of Radiology. He also was a legal scholar and a member of the Texas Bar. His law review articles have been cited as authoritative resources in legal decisions across the country.

In retirement, Reuter worked as an artist and traveled extensively to museums around the world. His art has been shown at the Gallery Nord in San Antonio and the MADI Museum of Art in Dallas. Reuter once said that his artistic inspiration was his many years of marriage to Marianne, who has a degree in museum management. The Stewart R. and Marianne C. Reuter Endowed Scholarship in Art at UTSA provides support for graduate students pursing M.F.A. degrees in fine arts studio disciplines including ceramics, new media, painting and drawing, photography, printmaking and sculpture.

"Their gifts have set many students on the path to success and fulfillment," said Gelo.

A memorial will be at the Gallery Nord, San Antonio, Texas, at 4 p.m., Aug. 28.