Monday, October 19, 2015


UTSA architecture professors study economic, cultural effects of S.A. Missions

Sedef Doganer
William Dupont

Sedef Doganer (top) and William Dupont

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(Sept. 11, 2013) -- Sedef Doganer and William Dupont, FAIA, professors in The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) College of Architecture, are studying the economic and cultural effects of the Historic San Antonio Missions campaign to become a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Site (WHS). In addition, the pair's research aims to help local business within the missions' surrounding communities flourish in the midst of the campaign.

The San Antonio Missions have been on the tentative list for consideration to become a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2008. They are scheduled to undergo review in 2015. If granted, the Missions district would be the first Texas site to attain World Heritage Site status. This status could potentially bring millions of dollars in economic development to the area.

In a study titled "Cultural Heritage Tourism and Authenticity: San Antonio Missions Historic District," Doganer and Dupont propose a model designed to leverage the Missions' local communities to advance the campaign for World Heritage Site status. The study, with input from David Bojanic, Anheuser-Busch Foundation Professor of Tourism in the UTSA College of Business and the San Antonio Small Business Development Center, is published in the conference proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Studies, Repairs and Maintenance of Heritage Architecture.

The proposed model would preserve the authenticity and integrity of the site by recruiting the missions' surrounding communities and tapping into local resources. They researchers suggest that to create an environment conducive to heritage tourism and positive economic development, the existing heritage of the local community would be promoted as a tourism resource.

"The San Antonio Missions are so popular because they give an authentic historical representation of Spanish architecture and the city's heritage," said Doganer, primary investigator for the study. "If the missions were to become a World Heritage Site, millions of dollars would pour into the area. If mismanaged, this might possibly be to the detriment of the authenticity that brought people to it in the first place."

Tourism can bring many benefits to the local economy, but it can also disturb the quality of life of local residents and the cultural authenticity to which tourists are drawn. In 2009, approximately 1.7 million tourists visited either one or all five of the missions. That number is expected to substantially increase if the missions to receive World Heritage Site status.

The study draws upon on existing plans by San Antonio to improve the San Antonio River, along which the missions rest. By educating local residents and business owners and giving them the tools to preserve the authenticity of their community, Doganer and Dupont hope the proposed model will be used to lead to a sustainable, unique cultural site for future generations. If effective, the proposed model will create jobs and direct the economic benefits to local entrepreneurs, thereby keeping the influx of money local where it would be spent and re-spent many times over.

"We could wait several generations to discover what the passage of time will leave behind for us to treasure, or we can proactively pursue the real market value of cultural heritage today," said Dupont, San Antonio Conservation Society Endowed Professor. "San Antonio has huge assets within the cultural heritage resources of our region. Tapping these cultural assets requires a little advance planning and some specialized knowledge of what they are and how to use them most effectively."

The UTSA College of Architecture Center for Cultural Sustainability has submitted a proposal for a community-based cultural heritage project based upon the study's model to the City of San Antonio for consideration.

The Center for Cultural Sustainability is a center for excellence within the UTSA College of Architecture. It provides academic research and services to benefit communities, completes large-scale research projects, provides research and educational opportunities for graduate students and convenes leaders in the field for dialogue on global practices concerning sustainable development and construction.

>> Learn more at the UTSA College of Architecture website and the UTSA College of Architecturs Center for Cultural Sustainability website.



Oct. 19, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

UTSA Grad Fest Fall 2015

Grad Fest is an event designed to prepare you for commencement while celebrating your achievement. You will have the opportunity to purchase commencement regalia, order class rings, diploma frames, explore graduate school opportunities, learn about successful Stafford loan repayment and discuss career outcomes.
H-E-B University Center Ballroom, Main Campus

Oct. 20, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

UTSA Grad Fest Fall 2015

Grad Fest is an event designed to prepare you for commencement while celebrating your achievement. You will have the opportunity to purchase commencement regalia, order class rings, diploma frames, explore graduate school opportunities, learn about successful Stafford loan repayment and discuss career outcomes.
H-E-B University Center Ballroom, Main Campus

Oct. 20-21, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

SECC Book Sale

Looking for a good read? Shop for yourself or for gifts and help change a life at the same time. Browse and buy children’s stories, novels and more at the 2015 SECC Book Sale.
Sombrilla Plaza, Main Campus

Oct. 21, 7-8:30 p.m.

Texas Water Symposium

The Texas Water Symposium will take a close look at the SAWS/Vista Ridge pipeline project. The program will feature a conversation about the regional, financial and ecological considerations of the 142-mile pipeline. The event is free and open to the public.
Main Building (MB 0.106), Main Campus

Oct. 22, 6 p.m.

Phi Kappa Phi Last Lecture

What would Dr. John Bartkowski say if it were his last lecture? The UTSA professor of sociology will speak about “The Power of Listening” in this annual event sponsored by the UTSA chapter of Phi Kappa Phi. A reception will follow.
Denman Room (UC 2.201.28), Main Campus

Oct. 26-30, All Day


The UTSA Department of Campus Recreation will host Climb-A-Palooza, a week-long climbing competition for all levels of climbers. Open to all Campus Recreation members and UTSA students.
UTSA Campus Recreation and Wellness Center, Rockwall, Main Campus

Oct. 27, 11:30 a.m.

Lecture by Composer Larry Groupe

The UTSA Music Department presents Emmy-award winning Composer Larry Groupe. Groupe has composed music for films such as "The Contender," "Straw Dogs" and "Miami Vice," and TV shows such as "Star Trek: The Next Generation," "Ren and Stimpy" and "American Gladiators." Lecture is free and open to the public.
Arts Building (ART 2.03.15-18), Main Campus

Oct. 28, 6 p.m.

Rowdy Halloween Hunt

UTSA will host a special campus-wide Halloween scavenger hunt. Event is free and open to students and Campus Recreation members.
UTSA Campus Recreation (RWC) North Gate / Paseo Entrance, Main Campus

Oct. 29, 5:30 p.m.

White Bound: Nationalists, Anti-Racists and the Shared Meanings of Race

The Dean's Distinguished Lecture Series continues with Dr. Matthew Hughey, a scholar of race, racism and racial inequality.
Buena Vista Building (BV 1.328), Downtown Campus

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UTSA writes the book on all-digital libraries

As touch screens and e-books demand more and more attention from both casual readers and scholars, many people say the handwriting is on the wall for the printed page.

At UTSA, the handwriting is on the wall for a library that doesn't have any printed books.

Since March 2010, the bookless library in the Applied Engineering and Technology Building has given UTSA students an innovative way to read, research and work with each other to solve problems.

With ultra-modern furniture and a décor featuring desktop computers, scanners and LCD screens, the AET Library is designed to engage students in an online format. But it also offers group study niches and study rooms with whiteboards and glass walls on which students can write. The space encourages teamwork, communications and problem solving for the next generation of scientists and professional engineers.

Did you know? The UTSA AET Library is the nation's first completely bookless library on a college or university campus. It served as a model for Bexar County's first-in-the-nation public bookless library system and one of its branches, the Dr. Ricardo Romo BiblioTech.

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